News

News

Tony Clinkscales Promoted to Service Center Manager
Posted July 20, 2018

On July 6, 2018, Tony Clinkscales was promoted to Service Center Manager at Darby Electric.  Prior to this, he held the positions of Sales and Field Service Manager,  DC Department Supervisor and was our first Servo Department Supervisor, setting up the original servo department in a 10 X 10 room. Our Servo Department has now grown into a dedicated servo building.

Tony has successfully handled repairs in-house and on-site for customers including CSI Vibration Analysis Testing, DC motor repair, Laser Alignment, pump repair and Root Cause Failure Analysis. Beginning his career with Darby Electric in 1988 with an Associate of Science Degree in Industrial Electronics, he is now in charge of our complete repair facility.

AC Motor Basics
Posted April 5, 2017

The AC Motor Basics Course on May 17 will fill up quickly. Register online under Training or call Darby Electric at 864-224-2131.

May 2017 AC Motor Basics Course Announced
Posted March 5, 2017

Darby Electric will have the next AC Motor Basics course on Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Sign up early because it fills up quickly.  Look for details under Training.

Darby in the News
Posted August 19, 2016

For 68 years, Darby family has built business and relationships in Anderson

KEN RUINARD/INDEPENDENT MAIL Darby Electric Company's Susan Darby Hamilton (left) and her brother Mike Darby look at a 13,000 horsepower motor part from Philadelphia, one the company is working to repair. The siblings are the third generation of managers at the business their grandfather opened on Aug. 9, 1948. The business is across the road from the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles office on U.S. 29 Bypass North in Anderson.

KEN RUINARD/INDEPENDENT MAIL Darby Electric Company’s Susan Darby Hamilton (left) and her brother Mike Darby look at a 13,000 horsepower motor part from Philadelphia, one the company is working to repair. The siblings are the third generation of managers at the business their grandfather opened on Aug. 9, 1948. The business is across the road from the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles office on U.S. 29 Bypass North in Anderson.
Posted: Aug. 12, 2016
 

Contributed photo: The late Steve Darby was the manager of Darby Electric before his children Susan Darby Hamilton (left) and Mike Darby became the third generation of managers at the place his father, Barney Darby, started in 1948.

Contributed photo: The late Steve Darby was the manager of Darby Electric before his children Susan Darby Hamilton (left) and Mike Darby became the third generation of managers at the place his father, Barney Darby, started in 1948.
Darby Electric in Anderson in 1960.

 

Contributed photo: Darby Electric in Anderson in 1960.

Contributed photo: L.B. Sargent, seen in 1968 at Darby Electric in Anderson.

Contributed photo: L.B. Sargent, seen in 1968 at Darby Electric in Anderson.

Contributed photo: A woman in accounting in 1968 at Darby Electric in Anderson.

Contributed photo: A woman in accounting in 1968 at Darby Electric in Anderson.

By Abe Hardesty of the Independent Mail

Posted: Aug. 12, 2016

Mike Darby vividly remembers the break between college graduation and his first day as a full-time employee at Darby Electric.

“I graduated on a Saturday and dad told me to be here on Monday morning,” Darby said last week, laughing at his father’s high standard for family members on the company payroll.

His sister, Susan Darby Hamilton, had an even shorter break when she graduated three years later. Her last day at Queens College in Charlotte was on a Thursday and she was at work Friday.

For the Darbys, the jobs required real work.

“He didn’t just sit us in the corner to give us money,” Mike Darby recalled. “We learned the business from the bottom up.”

That process began in 1977, when Mike Darby was a 16-year-old sophomore at T.L. Hanna High School and Hamilton was a 13-year-old seventh-grader at McCants Junior High School.

That summer, in the same building on U.S. 29 Bypass North in the city of Anderson, where they continue to work, the summer project called for a microfilm scan of every service job the company had performed since grandfather Barney Darby, who kept meticulous records, started the business in 1948.

“I thought it would take us forever. It was tedious. A lot of details,” Mike Darby remembers.

Such was the training process at Darby Electric, a family-operated business at which family has never been exempt from the hard work.

Mike Darby, now the chairman of the board, worked as a mechanic there in his high school and college years. Hamilton also spent years in the financial departments, all the while preparing to become the company president.

“He raised us to work here. We didn’t know any better,” Mike Darby joked on Tuesday, the anniversary date of the company’s first day of business in August 1948. “It’s fun to keep it going.

“We’re reminded pretty often that we’re a fourth-generation business, and not many last that long. It was dad’s dream that it did.”

And the dream, no doubt, of his father before that.

The company’s story begins in World War II, when Greenwood native Barney Darby learned armature rewinding, a subset of electric motor repair, while serving in the Navy. He came to Anderson in 1946 to work for a Woodward-Stephens shop, a well-known motor repair company.

Two years later, he and two friends, Duncan McIntyre Jr. and Edwin Dunlap, formed a partnership to begin a new company.

In contrast to the four buildings that make up the growing Darby Electric campus today, Barney Darby’s adventure began in the tight, modest surroundings of a basement of a commercial store on East Orr Street in Anderson now occupied by The Printer.

The business grew quickly, forcing two moves within the first seven years — the first to 115 River St. and the second to U.S. 29.

At the time, the road was known as “The Main Street of the South” because it connected Washington, D.C., to Atlanta. But Barney Darby’s primary concern was the transporting of motors to and from the 23 cotton mills operating in Anderson County.

The business has continued to grow on the road, expanding to three additional buildings since the relocation 61 years ago. The company that used a fleet of trucks to pick up and deliver motors in Barney Darby’s era now tackles jobs with corporations around the globe.

While Barney Darby was quietly building his business, he also built relationships in the community — serving as an active member of Anderson First Baptist Church, a member of the governing board at the YMCA, the Salvation Army and the United Fund (now United Way). He was president of the Lions Club at the time of his death in April 1973.

Joe Davenport, who followed Barney Darby as Lions Club president, remembers him as a leader well-known for his integrity.

“If ever there was an honest man, he was it,” Davenport said last week. “Barney was one of the finest people I’ve ever known.

“He was quiet, and when he spoke, people listened. He was generous with his time and his money; he sold a lot of brooms for the Lions Club.”

Steve Darby, a 1955 graduate of Boys High and 1959 graduate of The Citadel, followed his father’s civic lead.

He served in the Army from 1960 until 1962, then came home to serve the community while working at Darby Electric. He served several terms as president of the Anderson Rotary Club and the Anderson Jaycees and an international trade organization, and he was chosen by the Anderson Chamber of Commerce as 1995 Small Business Person of the Year.

In his eulogy of Steve Darby on Jan. 9, 2007, Anderson First Baptist Church senior pastor Jim Thomason called him “a high-responsibility person.”

“He didn’t seek accolades for what he did. He just did his best at everything he undertook, and people noticed,” Thomason said of Darby, who served many years as a deacon.

“When Mike called to tell me Steve had suffered the heart attack, it took my breath away,” Thomason said. “It was a huge loss to our church. He did everything in a quiet way, but did good things for a lot of people in our church and other organizations.”

When the church recently celebrated its 195th anniversary with a dinner, Thomason said he wasn’t surprised when he walked into the kitchen and found Mike Darby and his mother, Judy Darby, helping prepare the meal.

“They’re in the serving mode,” Thomason said.

Tri-County Technical College President Ronnie Booth had the same perspective when Steve Darby served as the chairman of board of the school’s foundation.

“Steve was fully engaged in life. When he was alive, I can’t recall ever going to a charity event and not seeing Steve and Judy there,” Booth said. “He modeled the way and set a high bar.”

“Michael is a whole lot like his daddy,” Booth said about the younger Darby, a graduate of The Citadel and Clemson and a past president of the Rotary Club of Greater Anderson. He also serves on the governing boards of the United Way and two career centers, and is chairman of Tri-County Tech’s Partnership for Academic and Career Education).

While the family-operated company is larger and more global than when Barney Darby moved it to the present location in 1955, the philosophy remains intact. Its staff of 30 includes 23-year-old Whit Hamilton, son of Susan and great-grandson of Barney Darby.

He’s working in various departments, none of them in the air-conditioned front office.

“He’s learning all of it,” his mother said.

It’s the Darby way.

Follow Abe Hardesty on Twitter @abe_hardesty

EASA Convention in Toronto, Ontario
Posted March 11, 2016

Darby Electric will be attending the EASA (Electrical Apparatus Service Association) Convention this June in Toronto, Ontario. The fourth generation of the Darby family is attending for the first time. Hope to see you there!

Mike Darby Honored by Community
Posted February 17, 2016

Mike Darby, Chairman of Darby Electric, and Judy Darby, mother of Mike Darby and Susan Hamilton were both honored as 15 Over 50 in Anderson, South Carolina who have continually contributed to our community and possess extraordinary leadership abilities. Congratulations to both of them!

Darby Electric at SCEC
Posted February 15, 2016

Darby Electric will be exhibiting at the South Carolina Environmental Conference at the Myrtle Beach Convention Center, March 13-15, 2016. Stop by Booth 141 and see Ray Weatherford and Scott Ashworth.

Darby Electric Now Offers Customized Training Courses
Posted December 29, 2015

Darby is committed to helping companies reduce total cost of ownership of equipment and reduce plant downtime. As a result of our successful standard courses, we are now offering custom training tailored to the needs of your company. There is no minimum enrollment and anyone in your company can participate, courses can take place during the week or weekend at your facility or ours. Below are a few sample topics:

  • AC Electric Motors – Basic electric motor theory from the Motor Challenge Program developed by the US Department of Energy.
  • Bearing Basics – Types of bearings, materials, tolerances, clearances, mounting fits, lubrication, and inspection will be taught. This seminar is geared toward first line supervisors and technicians.
  • DC Motor Maintenance – Types of DC Motors, basic diagrams, fields and compounding, interpoles and neutral, typical construction, lead number connections, direction of rotation, commutation and brush carbon grades, filming, sparking, and visual symptoms, and troubleshooting.
  • Predictive Maintenance – Preparation and implementation of a Predictive Maintenance Program includes Vibration Analysis and Electrical Testing. The results may require Alignment, Balancing, Lubrication, and Cleaning. Basic terms and problems associated with each discipline are taught.

To get started, contact us today.

Darby Helps Financial Institution Stay Online by Solving Complex Power Problems
Posted December 28, 2015

A financial institution in Georgia needed help keeping their server room on-line. Their servers provide critical transaction support and record-keeping for 300 branch offices. The uninterruptible power supply was working, but could not provide long term support because it would not transfer properly to the customer’s rooftop mounted backup generator. The customer had wisely chosen a natural gas powered generator, so fuel delivery is not an issue.

After investigation of the system components (generator, transfer switch, and UPS) Darby found that the generator was mismatched to its intended load. More specifically, a very large three phase generator had been installed to power a comparatively small UPS unit. The full load current was not sufficient to stabilize the generator’s output waveform, and the UPS would not accept the generated power, due to the level of distortion.

Several ways to solve the problem were analyzed, and the best solution was determined to be installation of an isolation transformer. A suitable transformer was selected, quoted, approved, and ordered, then scheduled for delivery (and installation) after business hours, in order to avoid disruption of financial services.

On installation day, the transformer was delivered late in the afternoon, installation began at 5:30 pm, and the problem was solved by 9:30 pm.

The server room can now survive a power loss and continue supporting the outlying branch offices.